Author Archives: Aleeza Horn

4 Tips to Keeping Your Best Employees [And Why It Matters]

Keeping your best employees is the key aspect of your company’s growth and productivity. After all, they are effective and efficient with the work that they do. Moreover, they can also affect the engagement levels of their coworkers.

The overall performance of your organization can be determined by the quality of your workforce. To name a few, two of the driving factors that set workforce quality is engagement level and leadership. 

The best employees are valuable because more than the quality of work that they produce, they are also leaders or if not, role-models that help motivate others to deliver excellent results.

According to Benefits Bridge, successful employees are ambitious, honest, have great emotional intelligence, strong work ethics and they also have good organizational and leadership skills. 

Having exemplary workers is one thing but how do you keep these remarkable people in your organization? It might surprise you that it may not be as difficult as you thought. Here are 4 tips to keeping your best employees.

Hire the Right People

According to TalentLyft, keeping your best employees begin with acquiring the right people for the right job. This is to ensure that candidates hired have the talent and personality to fit in with the culture of your company.

Bad hires or getting toxic workers are detrimental to your organization and they can also affect the morale of your best employees. According to a study conducted by CornerStone, “good employees are 50 percent more likely to quit when they work with a toxic employee, if the proportion of toxic employees on their team grows by as little as one on a team of 20.”

The same study also suggested that toxic employees have a negative effect on the productivity of their coworkers. It also suggested that the stress and burnout from toxic employees have a stronger influence than work tasks. 

Remember, no hire is better than a bad hire. 

Don’t Micromanage

Micromanaging your best employees does a negative effect on their productivity and morale. Here’s to show you the detrimental effects of micromanaging employees. 

The statistics are from a survey conducted by Trinity Solutions and Harry Chambers, author of the book “My Way or the Highway: The Micromanagement Survival Guide”. 

  • 79% of respondents experienced micromanagement.
  • 69% stated that they considered changing their jobs because of being micromanaged.
  • 36% changed their jobs.
  • 71% mentioned that being micromanaged interfered with their work.
  • 85% said that being micromanaged had a negative impact on their morale.

Here are the consequences of micromanagement according to Kathleen Rao, author of “How to Survive and Thrive in a Difficult Work Environment Under the Control of a Bad Boss”:

  1. Stress
  2. Health problems
  3. Job insecurity and economic problems
  4. Emotional strain
  5. Fatigue from working too much
  6. Lack of appreciation
  7. Lack of confidence

Even if you mean well, micromanaging your employees can make them feel like you don’t trust them. Manage with trust.

Here’s a quote from Steve Jobs, “it doesn’t make sense to hire smart people and then tell them what to do; we hire smart people so they can tell us what to do.”

Offer Good Employee Benefits

In terms of good employee benefits, what comes into your head when you hear the words “Google”, “Facebook” or “Netflix”? If you have done some researching about their employee benefits, you’ve probably imagined their impeccable offices, free access to gyms and swimming pools, free food and more.

You can only imagine how their employees think of their work. Top companies don’t just value their best employees but their entire workforce. As what Richard Branson said, “clients do not come first. Employees come first. If you take care of your employees, they will take care of the clients.”

We’re not saying you have to spend a fortune for employee benefits. In fact, you can offer something as simple as being able to work a few days per week from home. The American Express employee benefits have this perk along with casual dressing, paid holidays and more.

The American Express is number 72 on the Fortune 500. Another good example is the Alliant Employee Benefits. Alliant provides childcare, mobile phone discounts, legal assistance, flexible working hours, maternity and paternity leave along others.

Having good employee benefits help boost the loyalty and morale of your employees. 

Appreciate and Recognize their Efforts

According to a research by Gallup, the main reason why employees leave their job is because of the lack of recognition. Here’s a more terrifying finding from the same research, the more talented the employees are, the faster they leave.

An analysis from Gallup also showed that workers who don’t feel recognized are two times more likely to quit in a year. From the 2019 employee engagement report of Tiny Pulse, it was shown that just one in three employees felt they were recognized the last time they went the extra mile doing their work.

Give not just the best employees but all your workers the recognition for the excellent work that they do. Here are the benefits of recognizing the efforts of your employees according to Entrepreneur:

  • Lower employee turnover
  • Increases the happiness of employees
  • Boosts employee engagement
  • Improves trust

Recognizing your employees also improves their individual productivity. Being appreciated makes them enjoy their work more and it also gives them a feeling of satisfaction. 

Another study from Officevibe also showed that 82% of employees preferred words of affirmation than receiving gifts. Appreciated employees can become more engaged and a highly engaged workforce according to Gallup, is 21% more profitable. 

How often have you been giving praise to your employees? Keep the best employees by following the 4 steps we shared with you. 

To end this article, here’s a quote from Simon Sinek, “when people are financially invested, they want a return. When people are emotionally invested, they want to contribute.”

 

3 Best Steps to Boost Employee Morale in the Workplace [+Examples]

There are a lot of characteristics top companies have in common. One of which is having excellent employee morale. The workplace can demand tasks that can cause high stress levels.

One of the determining factors for workers to stay productive and remain working for the same business is employee morale. To boost employee morale is to boost the life of the company. 

While income is the life blood of the organization , employees make up its nervous system. It is important that the employees remain calm, confident, secure and joyful with their work. Otherwise, there could be an ill company culture.

Here are the 3 Best Steps to Boost Employee Morale in the Workplace:

  1. Be Genuinely Interested in the Employees
  2. Understand the Needs of Employees
  3. Communicate Positively – greetings

Be Genuinely Interested in the Employees

One of the principles from Dale Carnegie’s book, “How to Win Friends and Influence People”, is about being genuine to other people and how this affects both them and you. According to his book, humans are creatures of emotions, not of logic.

While we can create decisions, these decisions can be influenced by our emotions. One of people’s emotional desires is the feeling of importance. Make people feel that they are important and this can cause you to have less or even no trouble with them.

Moreover, it can make them feel that they are valued and this improves your relationship with them. It also raises their happiness and all these are factors in building up employee morale. 

You can make people feel important by:

  1. Knowing and calling them by their names
  2. Listening to them without interrupting them
  3. Calling them out for their mistakes indirectly
  4. Praising them for their work
  5. Asking them about their lives

According to Gallup Poll, 65% of employees stated that their efforts were not being recognized. When efforts of employees are not recognized, this can cause them to disengage. This is not what you want.

In the US, half the population of the workforce are disengaged or dissatisfied with their work. According to the Conference Board’s latest survey, only 51% of employees feel satisfied with their work. 

Here’s why employee engagement matters: 

  1. A report from Harvard Business Review showed that employee disengagement are costing their employers $450 to $550 billion per year. 
  2. Organizations with highly engaged employees are 21% more productive.
  3. According to statistics, 96% of employees believe that empathy improves employee retention. However, only 50% of employees stated that their employers are sympathetic.
  4. A Gallup workplace survey concluded that employees prefer praise over money for recognition. 

As what Richard Branson said, “take care of your employees and they’ll take care of your business”. Be genuinely interested in your employees and they will know that they are important to you. 

Understand the Needs of Employees

Employees spend one-third of their lives working. No one would want to spend that huge portion of their life to work that cause them stress and frustration. This is why companies that don’t give importance to employee morale have high turnover rates.

If you have high turnover rates, these are the consequences:

  • Lower productivity
  • A significant amount of time will be wasted trying to look for and hire candidates
  • Bad company image
  • High cost of turnover (90% to 200% of a worker’s annual salary)
  • Less people wanting to work for your business
  • Retraining hires
  • Your company could produce bad service

Understanding the needs of employees will help boost employee morale. The needs of employees range from good employee benefits to having a conducive work environment. Here are a few essential needs of employees:

  1. Purpose – employees need to feel that their work is more than just to sustain themselves financially. Opportunities should also be given to employees for them to feel a sense of contribution to the needs of people.
  2. Loyalty – workers need to feel secure in their organization, that the employer is with them and not against them.
  3. Growth – trainings and seminars for career development of employees.
  4. Employee Benefits – programs and compensations given in addition to their salary.

Communicate Positively

To foster employee morale, you have to communicate positively as a manager. You need to be wise with making decisions that could either help or hurt your employees. There are many ways on how you can communicate positively to boost employee morale.

You don’t necessarily have to directly be in contact with your employees to give them empowering words. Here are some ways on how you can communicate positively to boost employee morale: 

  • Brag about their outstanding performance.
  • Leave an “excellent job” sticky note.
  • A party for top performers
  • Do an announcement to simply congratulate your employees
  • Have a meeting to simply thank or congratulate your employees

When you compliment employees for the good work that they have done, they will feel appreciated and valued. According to Gallup Research, lack of recognition is the main reason why employees leave their job. 

A study conducted by socialcast showed that 69% of employees would work harder if they felt that their efforts are appreciated by their employers. As you can see, the role of the leader in terms of boosting employee morale is paramount.

Before employees can learn to help create a positive company culture, it is the leader that sets habits in place by being a prime example. Do all these and you’re sure to boost employee morale. 

Why Women Dominate the World of HR [Case Study]

The world is continuously changing and among one of the radical changes in human history is gender equality. To be more specific, gender equality in the world of working. Before, women were not given rights to take up a lot of different roles because of inequality.

Now, women make up 40% of the workforce and even dominate certain fields such as Human Resource (HR). While men still dominate a lot of fields, 73% of HR is comprised of women. There are reasons that support why women dominate this field.

In this article, we’ll share with you 3 reasons why women dominate the world of HR. You might be surprised to find out how the nature of the job is closely linked to biology and genetics.

The Stereotype

HR has always been known to be dominated by females. At its peak, up to nearly 80% are women in the field of HR. While the number of men in HR is dramatically increasing, women would still be dominating the world of HR for quite some time.

While it is a known fact that HR is a female-dominated field, it has never been an issue. The imbalance is even perceived positively as a welcome change from most other fields of work being dominated by men.

The statistics is also proof that men don’t feel an urgent desire to pursue HR jobs. With getting HR jobs, there are no restrictions that could hinder men from having it. No physical or mental factors are present to prevent or restrict men from acquiring HR work.

Even though HR jobs are available, men tend to choose other types of work. The long term trend of the HR being dominated by female gave it an image as work well-suited for women. Scientifically, this makes sense.

Biology and Genetics

The reason why most other fields are male-dominated and the rest are female-dominated can be deeply rooted in biology and genetics. For example, women working as crane and tower operators in America make up only less than 1%. In fact, they only make up 0.2%.

Here are more examples of one gender dominating the other:

  • Concrete workers and brickmasons are 99.9% male
  • Engine mechanics are 99.2% male
  • Child-care providers are 94% female
  • Home health care providers are 89% female
  • Veterinarians are 81% female
  • Social services workers are 85% female
  • Educators are 75% female
  • Nurses are 91% female

On a superficial level, it may seem to only be a stereotype. Building construction and mechanics are meant for men because it’s the type of job guys are interested in.

Meanwhile nurses and HR are mostly comprised of women because the responsibilities are feminine in nature. While those are vague reasoning, on a deeper level, biology and genetics are also in play. 

If you look at job descriptions of HR workers, much of the responsibilities are emotional in nature. Men tend to not find these type of work appealing. Additionally, females are preferred because they are traditionally recognized to be more empathetic and have good communication skills. 

In a recent research conducted by Rueckart and Naybar, they concluded that females are more empathetic than males of the same age. Not only that but they also found out that the differences grow with age.

The role of motherhood and taking care of children is also within the biology of women. This is why women are more empathetic. 

Jobs that require empathy and emotional skills such as nursing and HR are dominated by women because they are better-suited for the job. Both research and statistics support this.

This does not mean men can’t function excellently in these types of work. It just means women fit the roles better because of biology. Biology is the reason why women in recruitment is prevalent. 

The Future of Women in HR

Studies and statistics have shown that there will be no rapid decline in the larger percentage of women compared to men in HR. However, this has never been an issue and is positively received.

While there may be no rapid decline in the percentage of women in recruitment within the upcoming years, blurring of the gender line is still a possibility. A study conducted by CareerBuilder concluded that men and women historically balanced or even reversed gender domination in certain jobs.

For example, here are what used to be male dominated jobs wherein women were able to fill up nearly half its workforce. Here’s the percentage of women from these different careers:

  1. Lawyers – 48%
  2. Marketing managers – 47%
  3. Coaches and scouts – 41%
  4. Financial analysts – 40%
  5. Optometrists – 43%

Meanwhile, here are what used to be female dominated jobs and the percentage of men that fill these roles now:

  1. Cooks – 64%
  2. Pharmacists – 50%
  3. Technical writers – 41%
  4. Interior designers – 41%
  5. Bartenders – 48%

Regardless of different possibilities, there’s no denying that HR requires empathy and emotional skills. Biologically, women are better suited for the nature of the job and that’s why women dominate in HR.

What has been your experience between a female and male HR? Was there a difference? Let us know.